Next screening is German-American director Billy Wilder’s fast-paced, high-pitched, hard-hitting, lighthearted farce 

EINS, ZWEI, DREI
(1961, 110 min., dir. Billy Wilder, starring James Cagney, Horst Buchholz, Lilo Pulver, English Subtitles)  

DATE: 15 September

TIME: 17h00

VENUE: Howard Colleg, MTB (North wing, 1st floor), German Programme, Media Room F251  

Story: 
Assigned to manage Coke’s West Berlin office, MacNamara (James Cagney) dreams of being transferred to London, and to do this he must curry favor with his Atlanta-based boss, Hazeltine (Howard St. John). Thus, MacNamara agrees to look after Hazeltine’s dizzy, impulsive daughter, Scarlett (Pamela Tiffin), during her visit to Germany. Weeks pass, and on the eve of Hazeltine’s visit to West Berlin, Scarlett announces that she’s gotten married. Even worse, her husband is a hygienically challenged East Berlin Communist named Otto Piffl (Horst Buchholz). The crafty MacNamara arranges for Piffl to be arrested by the East Berlin police and to have the marriage annulled, only to discover that Scarlett is pregnant. In rapid-fire “one, two, three” fashion, MacNamara must arrange for Piffl to be released by the Communists and successfully pass off the scrungy, doggedly anti-capitalist Piffl as an acceptable husband for Scarlett. MacNamara must accomplish this in less than 12 hours, all the while trying to mollify his wife (Arlene Francis), who has learned of his affair with busty secretary Ingeborg (Lilo Pulver).

Seldom pausing for breath, Billy Wilder’s film is a crackling, mile-a-minute farce, taking satiric scattershots at Coca-Cola, the Cold War (the film is set in the months just before the erection of the Berlin Wall), Russian red tape, Communist and capitalist hypocrisy, Southern bigotry, the German “war guilt,” rock music, and even Cagney’s own movie image.

The film is set in West Berlin during the Cold War, but before the construction of the Berlin Wall, and politics is predominant in the setup. I.A.L. Diamond (screenplay) and Wilder’s social satire and sharp humor skewers targets on all sides of the divide — capitalists and communists, Americans, Germans, and Russians, men and women alike exhibit their own weaknesses and quirky foibles. As in Avanti! (1972), the humour of the film is partly based on the contrast between people from different cultures.

 

ALL WELCOME! NO FEES. 

For more details please contact: 

Dr Marion Pape
German Studies
University of KwaZulu-Natal
School of Arts
Durban, 4041
Email: papem@ukzn.ac.za
Tel: 0027-31-260 1086 / 2380
Fax: 0027-31-260 1242

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